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5 things to consider before you enter an MMORPG

The main thing that a good MMORPG consumes severely is your time.

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Image: Blizzard

It’s great you have time and inspiration to enter the MMORPG world. But there are some things you should know to minimize wasting your time chasing shadows. There are myths and prejudices that might have kept you away from the genre, and some of them hold some truth. But while long grinding can be skipped with services like WoW Boost, other aspects of MMORPG playing are not that easy to overcome. So, let’s get ready.

Time Is Running Faster Than You Expect

The main thing that a good MMORPG consumes severely is your time. (If it doesn’t and easily lets you go, drop it!) You can spend hours, days, even weeks leaving your computer or console rarely, even eating and sleeping next to it. Gaming addiction may be as serious as alcoholism or drug abuse.

Your real reward is, of course, not just about virtual swords and armors, spells, and skills. What you really get is the idea of progress; I once lost 40 pounds after leveling up my character in an MMORPG and thinking I can do the same in the real world. Another bonus is unexpected random communication, as players are always up for a chat. Finally, you get some escapist experience you may need just to relax.

Free Means More Expensive

While some games require a subscription on a monthly basis (or season passes bound to the in-game calendar), others are free to play. Don’t let them fool you: this means “pay-to-win”. Otherwise, you may just serve as cannon fodder for those who do donate.

Buying in-game currency seems an easy thing to try once. Yes, like any other drug. Chances are you’ll find yourself throwing more and more money in. Thanks for supporting our favorite games, but to avoid overspending, you better consider the number of your donations beforehand.

It’s Actually an Art

If you’re new to RPG games, you will suddenly discover there’s more to them than constant dog-eat-dog PvP and endless grinding. It requires team-building skills, knowledge of languages for international teams, strategic thinking, and timing. From makers, it requires even more: graphics and videos, cutscenes, and dialogue can be real masterpieces making movies and books pale.

In addition, there are often stories and backstories that mix real history, mythology, and fantasy, with lots of allusions to real events, people, fiction and nonfiction works, and stuff. Recognizing them (as easter eggs, cameos, or story arcs) is a part of the game, and it requires cultural background from a player. So if you think you’ll need to sacrifice books and movies – nope. Your hunger for them will only grow.

You Better Not Mix

It’s recommended to play just one MMORPG at a time. Simply because any decent MMORPG of today has a large, branched lore, especially if it’s around for long, like World of Warcraft or EVE Online. New titles, like Dual Universe, though, also offer detailed worlds and long branched storylines. All of them are so very immersive, and no wonder: the world has to be alive and have many aspects to keep you interested.

Playing two MMORPG’s simultaneously is just as little fun as reading two not-intertwining books or watching two shows, episode by episode. Maybe even less. Especially if these MMORPG’s exploit similar settings, like fantasy realms or outer space.

But Multiboxing Is Okay

Within one game, though, you can switch between multiple characters and explore the world from different angles. This will cause much less confusion. In some games (like the aforementioned WoW) it’s almost necessary to have a good roster of well-leveled characters of various races, skills, and covenants.

This is called multiboxing. Lots of players consider it great, even if it’s not required. In some games it’s just getting the full story told, which requires you look at it from different sides, participating in antagonistic factions.

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