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A water purification startup just raised $1 million for its smart point-of-contact filtration system

And it will use a… subscription model?

oollee water filter system
Image: oollee

The environment is in shambles. Global warming continues to strike, animals are going extinct at an alarming rate, and humans all over the world are subject to poor and harmful water conditions. While much of this will need to be addressed at the government level, there are individuals and startups looking for ways to improve things for their fellow humans.

Water purification startup, oollee, is one such company. The company looks to address poor water purification methods and plastic use at the point-of-contact. Considering that there will be more plastic than fish (by weight) in our oceans by 2050, anything that can help reduce plastic use is a step in the right direction.

The company recently announced that is has raised $1 million in pre-seed round funds to help bring its product to life

Its portable water filtration system uses reverse-osmosis and a filtration system to clean water at the point of contact. Minerals are re-introduced during the final stage of the filtration and contaminants caught in the filter can easily be disposed of.

The big question here is – how much will this device cost? Surprisingly, oollee is using a subscription-based pricing structure for its device. It will run users $29.99/month, which includes new filters each month. While I’m against this huge rise in subscription services and products, having something like this means you don’t have to keep up with remembering to change the filter.

It also includes some smart capabilities with an app that reminds users to replace their filter element and letting them order it with a single click. Users can also check water conditions, volume, temperature, and other factors.

The company has already onboarded 30,000 subscribers in Kazakhstan and is now introducing the subscription service to the US.

On the surface, this is definitely an interesting product and service, but I’m worried the subscription-based model may be a turnoff or simply unrealistic for some of the people that need clean water the most.

What do you think? Interested in oollee? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

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