Connect with us

News

Well, it’s happening, TikTok will be banned (kinda) in the US starting Sunday, September 20

You’ll still be able to use the app if you already have it downloaded, at least for the immediate future.

tiktok us flag and chinese flag
Image: KnowTechie

For a couple of months now, Donald Trump has been out to get TikTok, citing security concerns. And it’s definitely not because of all those dang kids that trolled his Tulsa rally, nope, it’s not that, it’s the security thing. Now, that is coming to fruition, with the US Department of Commerce laying out the new rules.

Oh, and before we get to that, apparently there was a potential deal with Oracle that could have kept the service from being banned in the US with Oracle maintaining TikTok user data in the US, but Trump didn’t like that one, so it was tossed out late this week.

Now, in a press release from the DoC, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross states, “Today’s actions prove once again that President Trump will do everything in his power to guarantee our national security and protect Americans from the threats of the Chinese Communist Party.”

So, what does a TikTok ban look like right now? Well, it’s a bit confusing. Starting on Sunday, September 20, users will be unable to download the app from stores like Apple’s App Store and the Google Play Store. If you already have the app, you can continue to use it, but you’ll no longer get updates to the app. So, if you haven’t joined the TikTok craze and are curious, now is the time to download the app.

Then, on November 12, the following bans apply to TikTok:

  • Any provision of internet hosting services enabling the functioning or optimization of the mobile application in the U.S.;
  • Any provision of content delivery network services enabling the functioning or optimization of the mobile application in the U.S.;
  • Any provision directly contracted or arranged internet transit or peering services enabling the function or optimization of the mobile application within the U.S.;
  • Any utilization of the mobile application’s constituent code, functions, or services in the functioning of software or services developed and/or accessible within the U.S.

It’s this part that would be the more overarching part of the ban, and where existing users would most likely see an end to their service. But wait, there’s more.

There is still the possibility that a deal with Oracle may be reached before this November 12 deadline. If Oracle and ByteDance (TikTok’s parent company) can reach a deal regarding TikTok’s services and data storage, the app could continue to live on in the US. This may face issues, however, as China has recently instituted bans on the export of certain technologies, including the algorithm that powers TikTok. Many consider this the “secret sauce” to TikTok’s success.

What do you think? Do you support a TikTok ban in the US? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

Editors’ Recommendations:

Comments

More in News