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Super messaging apps are the future of online communication

With the scope of messaging apps like Relevnt consistently growing, it’s clear that a permanent shift in the ways we communicate online is on the horizon.

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Have you ever thought that online messaging isn’t as immediate, or as interconnective as it could be? Online messaging has been a feature of the internet for decades, but recent innovations are finally changing the way people communicate online. Different social media websites and applications use different forms of messaging for different effects, but now so-called “Super Messaging Apps” are meshing these different features together into single cohesive messaging experiences.

It’s easy to imagine a future where online communities are far more intimate, by using technology that allows them to communicate with each other with a much greater degree of immediacy. Nearly 4 billion people worldwide use social media, but despite this huge number, meaningful connections over the internet are still rare. 

The average person has more than 8 social media accounts on different websites, which creates greater disconnection. Super messaging apps, which collect various methods of communication into a single app, can create this degree of intimacy, by letting users talk live through different virtual avenues.

One of the more popular examples of these apps, Relevnt, is one of the most cohesive messaging experiences we’ve seen in recent years. Relevnt users communicate using different community-based chat rooms. Each of these chat rooms contains both text and audio chat functions so users can directly communicate around their interests and opinions with other users. Similar to Reddit, there’s a chat room on Relevnt for nearly every topic imaginable, from sports to social causes. On Relevnt, however, the members of these communities communicate with each other much more directly.

It seems like a simple concept, but super messaging apps like Relevnt have the potential to change the way we talk to people on the internet. Sports fans, for example, can enter different chat rooms for all their favorite teams, and talk to other fans live during games or events. Especially during the pandemic, where large in-person gatherings are unsafe, talking online with fellow fans is a much safer alternative. 

The sports industry is one of the largest in the country, with its market value expected to rise to over $83 billion by 2023. While the sports industry has only grown during the pandemic – more people are staying home and watching games – the social aspect of sports fandom is dissipating, and this is where super messaging apps come in.

These new innovations in messaging technology are well-suited to music lovers too. Using these community based chat rooms, musicians could play for a live audience using the audio feature, while fans could communicate in the text chat. Popular pastimes like music and sports, as well as the ever-growing podcast scene have long been meshed with the internet. About 67% of sports fans regularly consume sports content via social media, and 400 million people already use streaming services for music and podcasts, so integrating these communities with group chat functions creates close online communities in an unprecedented way. Super messaging apps represent the fastest and easiest way to find online communities you resonate with since the inception of virtual messaging.

Browsing through posts on social media websites like Instagram and TikTok creates parasocial relationships, with little opportunity for genuine human interaction. Relevnt isn’t a social media app, there are no posts. The entire app is centered around direct community messaging and conversations, which creates genuine relationships between people based on shared interests and concerns.

With the scope of messaging apps like Relevnt consistently growing, it’s clear that a permanent shift in the ways we communicate online is on the horizon.

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