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Your car might require you to pass a sobriety test before driving by 2027

Organizations are working on a couple of different systems to detect drunk driving.

driver driving down road
Image: Unsplash

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has teamed up with the Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety (ACTS) to develop a technology that would help prevent people from driving drunk. A new infrastructure bill may require all vehicles to be equipped with this technology by the year 2027.

According to a new report from Vice, the bipartisan bill contains this provision deep within its 2,700 pages. If the bill is passed while including this provision, it will require all auto manufacturers that sell vehicles in the United States to include a still-in-development piece of technology that can passively test a driver’s blood alcohol content.

The two organizations mentioned above, the NHTSA and the ACTS, have teamed up to form a new acronym, DADDS. DADDS stands for the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety Program. The group is working on two different detection systems to try and passively detect how intoxicated a vehicle’s driver is.

The first system would be able to test the driver’s breath through the air in a vehicle’s cabin. The system will somehow have to differentiate between drivers and passengers, however. The second system would be able to test the driver’s blood alcohol content through touch, whenever the car is started.

Of course, for a system like this to be a mandatory requirement, it will have to be completely infallible. When trying to stop something as serious as drunk driving, it’s important that the system you are using is reliable and trustworthy. For that reason, DADDS is responsible for strenuous testing to ensure that the systems it comes up with are satisfactory for the difficult job they need to perform.

This seems like a pretty good idea. Drunk driving is incredibly dangerous, but for some reason, many Americans feel it’s necessary to do it every single day. Hopefully, this organization can come up with a reliable system that can be implemented into all vehicles in the future.

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