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Google One subscribers now have access to a free VPN on both mobile and desktop

The service is currently available to users in the US.

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Image: KnowTechie

Surfing the web via your WiFi internet connection is one thing. But surfing the web via a public WiFi network is entirely another matter. The thing is, public WiFi networks are significantly more vulnerable than private ones. That makes your personal information at risk of hacker attacks.

People aware of that always use a VPN service to protect their data from being stolen by hackers. A VPN service acts as a shield against hackers when surfing the web on unsecured networks such as public WiFi. It does that by hiding your IP address and stopping malicious parties from tracking your location. That way, you can securely browse, download, and stream via an encrypted connection. 

Recently, Google announced on its blog that they now offer free VPN protection to all Google One premium subscribers (2TB and higher plans) as added security for Android phones. With just one tap, users will be able to activate their Google VPN, which is built into their Gooogle One app, and their data will be safe from malicious attacks from hackers. When enabled, the service covers the phone’s internet traffic, regardless of which app or browser you might be using. 

This service is currently available only to premium Google One subscribers in the US. However, they plan to expand to other countries, as well as Windows, Mac, and iOS.   

In the announcement, they also introduced “Pro Sessions by Google One with VPN support.” Anyone that uses that service will get one-on-one counseling from a Google expert and learn how to stay protected online. 

Furthermore, premium Google One users also get 10% back in store credit for everything they buy in the Google Store. And if they decide to share their premium Google One plan with family members (not more than five of them), those family members will be able to use VPN on their services for free on their devices. 

What do you think? Is this new Google feature something you could see yourself using? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

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