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Here are the WORST passwords still being used in 2020

You should be ashamed.

worst password 2020
Image: KnowTechie

It’s 2020, and some of you are still using the worst passwords of all time on your online accounts. NordPass has put together another list of the top 100 worst passwords still in use in 2020, and some of y’all should be ashamed. Seriously, 123456 is NOT a secure password and anyone who uses it might as well leave their car keys in the ignition as well.

This has to stop, please, for the love of all that is cybersecurity. Experts put together all kinds of security measures to keep your banking details safe from criminal eyes, but if you insist on using password or qwerty or my personal favorite, iloveyou, please stop. Just stop. There’s no excuse for using easily remembered, already breached a million times over, passwords in 2020.

Use a password manager, use the longest password your online services will let you, and don’t worry too much about combinations of letters, numbers, and symbols, because password crackers don’t really care. They only care about the length, which increases the time taken to brute force the password.

Here are the worst passwords still in use in 2020:

  1. 123456
  2. 123456789
  3. picture1
  4. password
  5. 12345678
  6. 111111
  7. 123123
  8. 12345
  9. 1234567890
  10. senha
  11. 1234567
  12. qwerty
  13. abc123
  14. Million2
  15. 000000
  16. 1234
  17. iloveyou
  18. aaron431
  19. password1
  20. qqww1122

You can go see the rest of the (frankly horrifying) list over at NordPass. If your password is on this list, go change it. Consider signing up for a password manager, like LastPass or 1Password, or using the built-in password manager in Google Chrome or Safari to create unique passwords for every site you have a login for.

If you’re using any passwords on multiple sites, go change those to unique ones too, because not every website has the same level of security as your bank, and your passwords are only as secure as the least secure website you’re logged into.

What do you think? Surprised that people are still using these types of passwords? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

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