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Microsoft’s new ‘Super Duper Secure Mode’ for Edge is basically internet security on steroids

The mode sacrifices a little speed for more security.

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Image: Microsoft

The team behind the Edge web browser over at Microsoft is currently working on a way to make web browsing more secure. The new “Super Duper Secure Mode” is aiming to make it more difficult for malicious attackers by disabling certain features in the browser.

According to a new report from The Record, the company just announced its plans for “Super Duper Secure Mode” earlier this month. The way that Microsoft has achieved this heightened security on the Edge browser is by disabling a feature called Just-In-Time compilation, or JIT.

JIT is a feature that can speed up loading times on some websites. The feature allows Edge to pre-load certain data that may be necessary for the browser to do its job. If the code is needed, then it can be accessed much quicker using JIT. Whatever code is not needed at the time is then discarded.

microsoft edge super duper secure mode
Image: Microsfot

JIT is a great tool that can help speed up the Microsoft Edge browser, but it is also very complex. Because of its complexity, JIT code is one of the best ways that hackers can exploit Edge’s security. Of course, there are concerns over how much disabling JIT will slow down the Edge browser. Microsoft has ensured that disabling the feature didn’t make too much of a difference in most scenarios.

“Super Duper Secure Mode” is still in the very early testing stages. Some users who are running the test version of Edge may have access to the feature, but there is still very limited availability. If you are on Edge Dev or Beta builds, you can use the following flag to activate it: edge://flags/#edge-enable-super-duper-secure-mode

It will be interesting to see how Microsoft implements this feature in the future, and if the company sticks with that wacky name.

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