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The resale value of older MacBooks is plummeting because the new M1 versions are so good

No wonder there was a rush to sell off Intel-based Macs in the run-up to the release of the M1-based models.

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When Apple released its new, M1-powered MacBooks, they started smoking the earlier Intel-based MacBooks in almost any test thrown at them. That disparity in power and battery life has put the resale market for Intel-based MacBooks into a tailspin, with savvy shoppers going for the new M1-based machines instead.

If you think about it, would you buy a used MacBook Air for 80-percent of the price of a brand-new M1-based MacBook Air? You’d be missing out on over twice the performance, and 50-percent more battery life, to save a couple hundred dollars. That’s before you even factor warranty into the equation.

Just check out recent eBay listings, to see how far the prices have dropped. Even the i9-equipped MacBook Pro models that still outperform the M1-based MacBooks are selling way below their usual price. Nearly-new 2020 Intel-based MacBook Airs are in the $600-range when they used to sell for $800+.

No wonder there was a rush to sell off Intel-based Macs in the run-up to the release of the M1-based models. While some sellers are still trying to get top dollar for their older Macs, buyers have more information now and it’s going to be a hard sell to get anything near the previous resale values.

If you’re wanting to sell your Intel-based Mac to trade up to one of the new M1-based models, your best bet for maximum return might be Apple’s own trade-in program. If you’re a buyer, hold off on buying that Intel-based MacBook you’ve been eyeing, retailers are stuck with large inventories right now and they’ll have to price them to move before 2021 is out.

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