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An electrically stimulated taint is a happy taint – let this bandaid help

Electro in the sheets…

taint bandaid
Image: Morari Medical

CES 2021 has kicked off with a bunch of virtual slide shows and the enjoyable lack of human interaction. Frankly, this is how CES should be run every year. Just tell me about the dishwashing robot or the combination microwave air fryer, and let me get on with my day. I don’t want to go to Vegas to see all the tech and cadres of tech bros wearing matching tracksuits. I’m losing the thread. We’re supposed to be talking about taints.

Last year, CES opened up the floor to allow more sex tech. This is a good thing. We like sex tech, even if Josiah can’t break out of his cock cage. One of the under-the-radar discoveries last year was a taint bandaid with the purpose of assisting with premature ejaculation (PE). The goal of the product is to deliver a small shock to the taint, to help maintain an erection longer and stave off ejaculation. It’s a problem; it exists for numerous reasons, be it physical or mental, so deal. It’s a good idea.

Because it can be used for more than controlling a medical issue. It can be used for lightly shocking the taint.

So you aren’t supposed to put a TENS unit (generally used for medical nerve stimulation) on your genitals, but people do. If they don’t, they find some other way to electrocute themselves in consenting, low-voltage ways. It’s a thing people do, that cannot be argued. How they do it is the point of contention, and while the taint bandaid is meant as a medical device, let’s presume people aren’t going to use it completely as such.

The taint part of this is what has Gizmodo chuckling about it a year later. Fine. The taint is a sensitive area and is better off for being stimulated. This common area for any gender is an erogenous zone, responds well to stimulation and if used properly, can lead to better orgasms. Taint is also the blunt, commonly-used verbiage for perineum, which is what it is really called. Just thought you’d like to know, in case you don’t know.

The taint patch looks like a butterflied bandaid and theoretically will house a small, Bluetooth-controlled receiver that will deliver a shock

Morari Medical, the company working on the product, has released a video showing how the patch will work. It uses neuromodulation to inhibit the nerves, thereby delaying the now inevitable. This is also why it’s important to make sure your partner is fully satisfied (either orgasmically or consensually) before you start your electrical-impulse-enhanced thrust run. It’s a smart product with a helpful purpose, assuming it ever makes it to production.

The electrical parts of the taint bandaid patch thing will be covered by a one-time-use adhesive that promises to not hurt your sensitive perineum. The current pricing for the single-use part ($25) is a bit high considering, but that will probably be lowered as the product nears production and interest grows. The company is hoping to have the thing launched by the end of the year to compete with current PE or ED products such as Giddy. I’m assuming that competition because it is inevitable. Frankly, I’ll take the electric bandaid.

Medical assist aside, the fun part about all this is the electric bit. Even if you don’t have issues with PE, any extra stimulation to add some extra zap to the bedroom is a good thing IMO. Needless to say, this is the thought process that is causing obnoxious morning radio shows to book Morari’s founder, Jeff Bennett.

This patch from Morari seems a whole lot safer than sitting on a 12-volt battery. Not that I’ve ever done that. It was several 9-volts banded together.

Have any thoughts on this? Would you use this? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

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